SideArrowDownArrow-RedLeftArrowRightArrowUpArrow-DkGrayCloseXMagnifyingGlassHamburgerMenuIconProVan
Search

Helping you plan your home improvement project, from start to finish


By on Jan 13, 2015
How To Repair Drywall

Whether you live in an apartment, a huge mansion, a rural or urban setting, your walls most likely consist of drywall. With little competition on the market, combined with its low cost, there’s really no comparison.

Nonetheless, we don’t live in a perfect world and drywall repair is always on the horizon. Bursting pipes, excess water, corrosion or even your doorknob can easily damage your drywall. Fortunately, unless you have a mammoth hole in your wall, any homeowner can repair the most common drywall mishaps. Watch and see how you can repair drywall without a professional.

Drywall

Drywall Basics

There are various types of drywalls. The most common types of drywall include:

  • Whiteboard
  • Fire-resistant
  • Greenboard
  • Blueboard
  • Cement board
  • Soundboard
  • Soundproof
  • Mold-resistant
  • Enviroboard

The typical drywall panel measures 4’ X 8’, is ½” thick, weighs about 53 lbs., and can be very awkward to maneuver. The product comes in a variety of sizes and thicknesses. In addition to the typical size, you can usually get longer panels - in 2’ increments up to 14’ - on special order. The thickness ranges from ¼” to ¾”, but for consumers, the usual choices are 3/8”, ½”, and 5/8”.

To help determine the right and amount of drywall for your repair project, please see our drywall calculator.

Drywall Repair Costs

The average price to repair drywall is $550. The extent of the damage will play a key role in the price and timeframe. As I said earlier, most homeowners can repair minor damage (patch) to any drywall, but larger holes may require a drywall professional.

Reapir Drywall

Tools Needed for Repairing Drywall

A quick trip to your local hardware store should provide you with all the materials and tools you need. You should purchase:

  • Drywall putty, spackle, repair paste or joint compound
  • Sandpaper or a damp sponge
  • Drywall knife or scraper
  • Drywall patch
  • Actual drywall
  • Pencil
  • Measuring Tape
  • Saw
  • Small pieces of wood

How to Repair Drywall

Homeowners should feel confident in repairing drywall holes up six inches in diameter. However, there are small holes that can form from a hanging picture, medium sized holes from a doorknob, or larger holes from your kids, pets and so on. These holes require different steps to repair.

How to Repair Small Drywall Holes

1. Scrap off any excess drywall on the surface.

2. Sand down or use your damp sponge to clean all around the surface. Some tape a garage bag to the wall to ensure no dust falls on the ground.

3. Apply whatever drywall putty you chose (spackle is common for small holes) onto your drywall knife.

4. Scrape the putty on the wall, covering the entire hole. Even the putty out.

5. Sand it down and clear off any drywall dust.

6. Apply paint to match wall.

Drywall Paste

How to Repair Medium Sized Drywall Holes

1. Scrap off any excess drywall on the surface.

2. Sand down or use your damp sponge to clean all around the surface. Some tape a garage bag to wall to ensure no dust falls on the ground.

3. Place drywall patch onto the wall over the damaged area. This should be a self-adhesive patch, but you can apply some tape if need be.

4. Apply whatever drywall putty you chose onto your drywall knife.

5. Scrape the putty on the wall, covering the entire drywall patch. Even the putty out and remove any excess putty.

6. Sand it down and clear off any drywall dust. Some homeowners add second layer of putty at this time.

7. Apply primer and paint to match wall.

How to Repair Large Drywall Holes

1. Scrap off any excess drywall on the surface.

2. Sand down or use your damp sponge to clean all around the surface. Some tape a garage bag to wall to ensure no dust falls on the ground.

3. Make sure there are no electrical wires behind the damaged area. If not, measure the length and width of the hole.

4. If hole is too big, you may need actual drywall to repair instead of a drywall patch.

5. Cut new drywall piece to match length and width of the hole. Add a few inches on each side. You want a good square rather than a circle.

6. To make sure the newly cut drywall piece fits into the wall, you may have to cut some existing drywall. Take your newly cut piece and put it on the wall. Trace around it. Cut around your trace with a utility knife.

7. If there are no studs behind the damaged area, you may have to add small piece of wood behind. Cut them to fit the area and drill in with drywall screws. Studs or your new pieces of wood should be on both sides of the damaged area.

8. Drill your new piece of drywall into the studs.

9. Cover seams of drywall with mesh drywall tape.

10. Sand it down and clear off any drywall dust.

11. Apply primer and paint to match wall.

To really see how it’s all done, watch this terrific Lowe’s video below.

Drywall Patching Alternative

According to our friends at HomeAdvisor, one alternative to the common drywall patching compound is paintable caulk. If, for some reason, you find your drywall cracks repeatedly (around the edge of a windowpane, for example), apply a paintable caulk, that is also water washable, directly into the crack with your finger. Before it sets, wipe down with a clean damp cloth to smooth and allow the existing texture to bleed through.

Conclusion

Whether it’s via a loose nail or an open door, your drywall will need its fair share of patching and repairs. Before calling a pro, try and fix it yourself. This is one of the easiest DIY projects and can save you hundreds of dollars.

If the damage is too great, please click here and get connected with up to four drywall contractors near you!


Get up to 4 Free Quotes!

Zip Code
Project
comments powered by Disqus
2016 JDR Industry Blogger Award Winner for Best Microblog