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Guide to Heat Pump Repair Costs

Regardless of whether you happen to live in a warm climate or a cool one, a heat pump can make the interior temperature more pleasant through a thermostat and a simple heat extraction process. Unfortunately, heat pumps don't last forever, and there are several different kinds of problems that can crop up over time. Use this guide to better anticipate any problems and to have a clear picture of the cost of repair whether the problem is the thermostat, the condenser or anything in between.

National Repair a Heat Pump Costs

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by ImproveNet members.

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Average reported cost

based on 1958 cost profiles


Minimum cost


Maximum cost

Most homeowners spent between:




National Repair a Heat Pump Costs
Average reported cost $332
Number of Cost Profiles 1958 cost profiles
Minimum reported cost $55
Maximum reported cost $1,000
Most homeowners spent between: $201 to $328

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Average Cost of Professional Heat Pump Repair

With a variety of different types of heat pumps in homes as well as a range of problems that can occur, it is nearly impossible to speculate on the exact cost of heat pump repair. However, having a rough estimate based on previous repair costs can be a big help for homeowners when it comes to budgeting for their own heat pump. On average, expect the cost of heat pump repair to fall somewhere between $1,192 to $1,888.

Cost of Replacing the Heat Pump Thermostat

If either the heating or cooling is not working properly in the home, one of the first things to look at is the thermostat of the heat pump system. If you are lucky, only the thermostat will need to be repaired or replaced, and the heat pump will still be in good condition. The cost of having a professional come in to check and replace your thermostat can be as little as $200.

Common Type of Heat Pump Repairs

While thermostat repair is certainly the cheapest, condenser problems on the outside of the home are also a relatively affordable fix. Ductwork issues, on the other hand, can be significantly more expensive.

Cost of Replacing an Existing Heat Pump

Unfortunately, damage to the heat pump can sometimes be so extensive that replacement is necessary. In these cases, the costs will run significantly higher for the homeowner. To remove a broken heat pump and install a new one, the price range is typically somewhere between $2,000 and $7,500.

Heat Pump Troubleshooting

Then again, rather than hiring an HVAC pro, you could try to fix te heat pump yourself. Below are a few basics steps you should take before calling a heat pump professional.

  1. Make certain that the thermostat is set higher than the actual room temperature and the selector switch is on heat if heat is needed, or that the thermostat is set lower than the actual room temp and the switch is on cool if air conditioning is desired. If the thermostat is programmable, be certain the batteries are fresh.
  2. Test for power to the air handler by moving the fan switch from "auto" to "on." If the blower runs, the air handler is functional. If nothing happens, check the circuit breakers on the air handler cabinet and the breakers or fuses in the main panel. If any breakers are tripped, reset them once. If they trip again do not reset them. Deadly high voltage conditions exist inside the air handler cabinet and inside the access panel of the condenser. Let a qualified serviceman open them. 
  3. If the air handler runs constantly but cannot satisfy the thermostat setting, it is possible the backup heat is running but the condenser is not. Some condensers have the high pressure cut-out switch externally accessible. Look for a button sticking out of the cabinet in the vicinity of the refrigerant pipes. Press it in. If the machine starts up, the head pressure got too high, possibly from turning on and off too quickly, too much or too little refrigerant, or an electrical interruption. As the unit ages, the switch can weaken and pop easily. If the condition repeats itself often, have a serviceman check it.
  4. If there’s a lot of frost or ice buildup on the machine outside, then it’s low on refrigerant. You can manually force it to defrost with a motor or timer, depending on the model and age of the heat pump.
  5. If those don’t work, then they’ve gone bad and need to be replaced. However, there are pins that can usually be pushed to initiate defrost. Because all the controls are internally mounted and high voltage wiring is exposed, only a serviceman should open panels.
  6. If motor is having a hard time starting or not starting at all, you will need to call for service either to diagnose the wiring to the heat pump or to replace the heat pump, depending on whether it’s stuttering or actually dead.

Last updated on May 17, 2016

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