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How Much Does Marble Flooring Cost?

It's hard to find a flooring material more opulent than marble. Known for its use in imperial palaces and famous works of art, marble is naturally harvested from the earth in massive slabs that are then transformed into unique, artistic tiles. Adding marble flooring to an entryway, hallway or bathroom imparts a degree of luxury, timelessness and exclusivity that most other flooring materials can’t compete with.

Notable for its high shine, unique colors and patterns and translucent glow, marble flooring is clearly a big investment when it comes to costs. However, by understanding the reasons behind the higher cost for marble flooring and the advantages that it offers, homeowners can confidently add style and class sure to last for years to come. If you’re ready to add this degree of style and class, let us connect you with a flooring professional near you.

Table of Contents

  1. Marble Costs
  2. Cost Factors of Marble Flooring
  3. Marble Flooring Types
  4. Marble Costs Compared to Other Flooring Types
  5. Advantages of Marble Flooring
  6. Disadvantages of Marble Flooring
  7. How to Clean Marble Floors
  8. Find A Pro

Marble Costs

  • Lower-end marble floor tiles cost $5 - $7 per square foot
  • Middle-grade marble tiles and larger slabs cost $8 - $11 per square foot
  • Specialized marble tile patterns, colors or designs/mosaics can cost anywhere from $30 - $50 per square foot, including installation 

Once installation costs are added, these expenses only increase. Homeowners are likely to spend anywhere from $16 to $24 per square foot on basic marble tile installation. Labor costs go up with higher-quality tile and job-specific installation factors such as adding patterning or removing old flooring and waste.

Cost Factors of Marble Flooring

Marble is a mined material with natural patterns and variations that make no two pieces exactly alike. For the most uniform marble flooring, homeowners must get all their tiles from the same harvest. Furthermore, the Marble Institute of America groups tiles according to their clarity and "working soundness," which refers to the surface of each piece and how that may affect fabrication and installation. For the best results, all tiles should be of the highest grouping (either Group A or Group B). However, homeowners can save money by opting for lower groupings of marble tiles (Groups C and D), which may have more inconsistencies or contain more visual flaws such as veining. It’s important to note why marble is grouped lower, however. Too many inconsistencies on the surface of the tile may make marble installation more cumbersome and increase labor costs, negating any savings.

Additional factors that affect the final cost of marble flooring materials include the thickness of the marble and the size of each tile. Buying thinner marble or cultured marble, which is a mixture of marble dust and cement, costs less than buying thick, solid marble tiles. In addition, opting for standard 12x12-inch or 12x18-inch tiles is less expensive than buying larger 12x24-inch tiles or those in custom shapes and sizes.

Marble Flooring Types

The term "marble" actually refers to several types of natural stone made up of different amounts, or saturations, of magnesium carbonate, a white mineral. Magnesium content directly affects the color and patterns present in the marble, which is classified into one of three groups:

  1. Calcite: Less than 5% magnesium carbonate
  2. Magnesium: Between 5-40% magnesium carbonate
  3. Dolomite: More than 40% magnesium carbonate

In addition to its physical makeup, the colors and patterns of marble further distinguish different types from one another. Popular types of marble used in flooring tiles include:

  • Carrara: This is the classic type of marble most commonly seen in works of art and mined in the hills of Italy from the Carrara region. Carrara marble is notable for its pure white color and sleek look that adds a pristine, regal effect in any room.
  • Calacatta: Often confused with Carrara marble, Calacatta is actually considered a more luxurious cut of stone that’s also mined in the Carrara region. It’s distinguished by its deep, dark black and gray veining patterns that, when set against the pure white of the marble, make a striking contrast perfect for statement rooms.
  • Statuary: Another type of marble that resembles Carrara, statuary marble includes gray tones of veining that create a contrast midway between Carrara and Calacatta. It’s popular in all rooms, especially entryways and halls, because it reflects light, leaving a shiny finish that makes spaces seem bigger.
  • Breccia: A much darker stone, Breccia marble is usually brown or red in color with dark veins that provide a noticeable, dramatic impact. It may also include shades of green.

Marble Costs Compared to Other Flooring Types

When contrasted with other statement flooring options, the expense of marble is easier to accept. Of course, there are also less-expensive options as well. The following table compares the price of marble floors to several other common floor types for easy analysis:

Type of Flooring

Low Cost (per square foot)

High Cost (per square foot)



















Ceramic Tile






Wood Flooring, General



Advantages of Marble Flooring

The reason that many homeowners opt to install marble floors is simple: their look. Marble floors come in a rainbow of options that create a unique color palette and contrast enhanced by swirls and shade variations designed by Mother Nature herself. Marble can also take on high shine and polish, which make those colors easy to admire. This high shine makes marble nearly translucent, reflecting light and making a small space seem larger or even ethereal. This is why so many artists choose marble as a sculpting medium and why the effects of marble in spaces such as halls and entryways are so dramatic.

Disadvantages of Marble Flooring

Of course, marble floors have some disadvantages. The same properties and aesthetics that make marble such a beautiful, luxurious option also make it delicate and tricky to maintain. The smooth, shiny surface of marble can be slippery, making it dangerous to buff floors to a high gloss. In addition, marble surfaces easily scratch and stain. They’re also subject to "etching," which happens when acidic substances begin to break down the alkaline surface of the marble.

Cost Factors of Marble Flooring

How to Clean Marble Floors

Because of the porous, delicate nature of marble, proper cleaning is essential. This starts with preventative measures such as professionally sealing marble floors using a specially formulated barrier-sealing chemical. Do this during and after installing the floors, and then reseal them on a yearly basis.

Daily cleaning and weekly mopping ensure dirt and debris that could scratch the surface of the marble are removed. When cleaning marble floors, mind the pH and use cleaning products that have a neutral acid/base effect. Never use acidic cleaners, such as vinegar, on marble floors. Instead, use a highly diluted cleaning mixture of about half a cup of ammonia or mild dish soap in a 5-gallon bucket of water. Dry the surface by hand using a fluffy towel.

Find A Pro

If you’re ready to upgrade the flooring in your home, marble is a timeless choice that adds both value and style to any room. For added luxury and a regal touch, consider hand-laid marble floors and mosaics, and make sure everything is professionally sealed on a regular basis.

Ready to get those floors in and discuss designs and colors? Connect with a flooring professional in your area here to get started.

Last updated on Jul 22, 2016

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